1c3d0g

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Everything posted by 1c3d0g

  1. 1c3d0g

    Official Thank You thread

    Yeah, I'm still around Firon. I don't have time for forums and such anymore (I'm always busy as hell) but I still try to keep myself up to date with the software releases. Anyways, great job with uTorrent, guys. This is one of the few bullet-proof programs out there, it just never fails me. Amazing!
  2. 1c3d0g

    Official Thank You thread

    Old timer here. Thanks for everything, uTorrent. :cool:
  3. Settings suggestions based on 1c3d0g's guide are not recommended for use -- they give you settings that can and likely will overload your connection. Make use of the Speed Guide (Ctrl+G) in µTorrent instead. "In the interest of making better torrent swarms," (Switeck) this thread is hereby locked. If anyone disagrees with this decision, swing by the IRC channel and give us reason to change this stance. You can read the rest of his very detailed post over here. John123 has some pretty good settings for very high-speed Internet users...you can view his optimized settings over here. Attention: MaV has created a very cool script that automagically calculates values from this mini-guide, so it's even easier than before to get your optimized settings. If you follow the script route, you can ignore the rest of the text below. ·································································································· Now that we're done with the basic tweaking of your PC, it's time to open up µTorrent and go into its Preferences. I'm going straight to the point: get a calculator (Windows has one built-in, or get M$ Power Calculator) if you can't do basic math like me, because we're going to be calculating the most optimized values for your connection by hand. I'm going to use 640 kb/s down and 128 kb/s up as an example...make sure to replace these values and use your own download and upload speeds when doing the math. Ready? OK. Go to Options -> Preferences... -> Network Options. Once there (and I assume you've forwarded your port and all that), we're going to look at your Global maximum upload rate. How you calculate this value is very simple. Take your maximum upload speed (in this instance I'll take 128 kb/s) and divide it by 10. Note: if you're a high-bandwidth user (> 1 mb/s), feel free to substitute 10 with 8. So: 128 / 10 = 12.8 Then, we're going to use about 75%~85% of this value. If you have a really slow upload speed, 75% is a bit more forgiving, but if you're on a really fast connection, feel free to use a higher percentage, like 85%. I do not recommend going higher than 90%, because this will be too close to your maximum upload speed and will probably choke your bandwidth at some point. So: 12.8 x .80 = 10.24 µTorrent only allows you to use whole rounded numbers, so on this ocassion we'll use 10. If you still experience some websites that are timing out, or you're having other types of problems (like difficulty sending e-mails for instance), feel free to lower this to 9. However, if you're primarily seeding and are barely using the PC for Web browsing, you can safely use 11. In this case, I'll just leave it at 10. ● Global maximum upload rate (kB/s) = 10 I'm going to leave Alternate upload rate when not downloading alone as only you are the one who can decide if this applies to you or not. :| Whatever you're going to do, don't set it higher than 90% of your maximum upload speed. Protocol Encryption can help you use BitTorrent again if you're being unfairly throttled by your ISP. If this is the case, just set it to the example below: ● Outgoing: Enabled √ Allow incoming legacy connections Now we're going to click on Torrent Options. I'll jump right in. Let's look at Global maximum number of connections. This value is very, very easy to guess. Just take your upload bandwidth in kb/s and put it in there. In my case it's 128 kb/s, so we'll put 128 as the number. ● Global maximum number of connections = 128 The next thing we'll tackle is Maximum number of connected peers per torrent. You should generally use the speed guide's recommendation as far as connection counts per torrent goes. Values higher than 100 should not be used unless you have 10Mbit, and even then, you shouldn't go beyond 125 connections per torrent. Now you can put that number in the box next to it. ● Maximum number of connected peers per torrent = 16 Then we'll continue on to Number of upload slots per torrent. This number should obviously never fall below 1...keep that in mind. In case you have a really low upload speed, like 33.6 kb/s (standard dial-up), keep it at 1. You could try 2, but that's already pushing it. :/ Anyway, how you calculate this value is a bit tricky. First, look at what number you put at your Global maximum upload rate (in Network Options). In my example it was set to 10 and I divided it with 4. So: 10 / 4 = 2.5 I'll take the side of caution and use 2 upload slots per torrent. However, I'm going to advise you to tick (check) Use additional upload slots if upload speed <90%. Just in case someone needs those extra few bits. ● Number of upload slots per torrent = 2 √ Use additional upload slots if upload speed < 90% I'm going to leave Queue Settings alone as only you are the one who can decide what's best for you. Saying that, I still recommend using some common sense and try to download one torrent at a time. Yes, I know we're all in a hurry to get everything quickly (like McDonald's fast food), but please, think of the swarm! By uploading pathetic little bits here and there, it's only going to hurt the BitTorrent community even more. So be cautious when downloading (don't try running everything at once) and once you're finished don't forget to seed back to others who also want to enjoy what you've downloaded. In Other Settings, I enable all of them, and you should tick (check) them all as well. Really, this one needs no explanation. DHT (Distributed Hash Table) can really be a life saver when a tracker goes down. No reason to have it off, as it's automagically turned off if you're downloading a private torrent. However, if you experience time-outs, frequent disconnects etc., it might be worth a try to turn it off and see if it makes any difference: √ Enable DHT Network Same here with the last option. No reason to turn it off: √ Enable DHT for new torrents Peer Exchange is just another way to get info about more peers...a very helpful mechanism: √ Enable Peer Exchange Scraping regularly checks the health of a torrent (how many seeds/peers there are etc.), so I suggest enabling it: √ Enable scraping Unless you're having severe disk space problems, it's better to pre-allocate the space to the torrent. I've found it also reduces constant writing significantly: √ Pre-allocate all files OK, now it's time for us dive into µTorrent's Advanced Options. I'm going to address only those settings which I believe are going to give you a boost...the rest are better left alone unless you know what you're doing. Remember how I told you to patch your TCPIP.sys file a while ago? You should patch this to 80% of the value you specified in tcpip.sys (40, if you followed my recommendations). MAKE ABSOLUTELY SURE THIS VALUE IS LOWER THAN THE VALUE YOU SET IN TCPIP.SYS! Aggressive surfing won't be affected this way. Note: if your modem/router seems to time-out, frequently disconnect etc., you may have to lower the values for the sake of stability. ● net.max_halfopen = *40. If you can't maintain your upload speeds/can't seed properly, or you know that your ISP is shaping BitTorrent traffic (slowing down your network connection), try setting peer.lazy_bitfield to *true. It could help you with your problems. Also, it appears port 1720 (a VoIP [Voice over IP] port) is being unthrottled by some ISP's, so you may have to check that out as well. Alternatively, if all else fails, you could try port 443, 80, 21, 110 and as a last resort, 25. But it's better if you could try to find out what ports your ISP uses for NetMeeting/VoIP/Xbox Live etc. This is a legitimate question and they should be able to answer you what ports they use for these services without any problem/suspicion. It could very well be possible that you can bypass their BitTorrent restrictions using these types of ports. Here's a handy list of ports and their common uses. Also, switching ISP's to one that is known not to mess with BitTorrent traffic can also help tremendously, if it's an option for you. And switching to Geico can save you 15% or more on car insurance... ● peer.lazy_bitfield = *true Another setting I've encountered that gives me a somewhat more stable connection is to set the disconnect interval to a higher value. Some people recommend turning it off completely, however I find that it can still be useful in some cases. Experiment and see what's best for your situation. On my system, I've set it to disconnect after 10 minutes instead of the default 5. ● peer.disconnect_inactive_interval = *600 And lastly, if you're having problems with your hard disk that can't keep up with your download speeds (or you get a Disk Overloaded message in your status bar), you may have to modify µTorrent's cache to something higher. You can set it to 4x ~ 8x your maximum download speed. Remember to never set it below 2048 (2 MB). Higher than 32768 (32 MB) is not recommended, however if you still get the Disk Overloaded message it wouldn't hurt to try. 640 x 4 = 2560 ● diskio.write_queue_size = *2560 It's recommended to do the same with the Read Cache, as it can help ease the constant disk access considerably. 640 x 4 = 2560 ● diskio.read_cache_size = *2560 Now we're ready to see if we can get better speeds by downloading an OpenOffice.org torrent (keep in mind that OOo is a very well-seeded torrent, thus it represents a best-case scenario). This particular torrent should easily max out your download bandwidth. So, to recap: there are many things that could be slowing down your BitTorrent downloads/uploads. Also, do not expect to always max out your download speed as this is totally unrealistic. It's more of a lucky one-time occurance than the norm. And if there are too few seeds and many peers in a swarm, your downloads will be slow, there's no way around it. Other than that, I hope you've found this mini-guide useful. Always remember: be a seeder, not a leecher! Have fun using µTorrent and Good Luck! :cool:
  4. 1c3d0g

    µTorrent 1.5 released

    Last I heard, it was gonna be v.1.6, as the WebUI and the other stuff are "big" additions/changes.
  5. 1c3d0g

    µTorrent 1.5 released

    Slimy: uhm...yes we have, although it's private.
  6. 1c3d0g

    µTorrent 1.5 released

    Careful...I'd be very, very wary of installing that "µTorrent v.1.6"...any build not distributed through www.utorrent.com should be treated as hostile. :/
  7. G is 54 Mb/s max, <= v.4 had Linux firmware, v.5 is VxWorks, GS can achieve higher throughput (can't recall exactly how much), but only with the same equipment (meaning if you have another D-Link/Belkin etc. router crap, it won't achieve speeds > 54 Mb/s), GL is 54 Mb/s max and is guaranteed built upon a Linux kernel. I'd go with a GL, if I were you.
  8. 1c3d0g

    µTorrent 1.5 released

    Hosfhi: it's probably the leaked 439 build...don't worry about that, it's about to be superseded anyway...
  9. I always love hearing people get better speeds...thank you!
  10. 1c3d0g

    utorrent works on LINUX!

    Damn it. Just when I thought it would be safe to move to Linux...hopefully the next version will fix it. :/
  11. 1.) Because people keep complaining that µTorrent "ramps up slowly". Well, the patch fixes that and still allows enough connections for aggressive surfing/multiple downloads (FTP etc.) at the same time. You can lower it if don't think you'll need that much. The guide is not the end all be all. 2.) Yes, that's what I use and on most torrents I get great speeds. Too many connections will steal your bandwidth because µTorrent has to keep communication with all those peers, most of them which you'll not receive anything. It's better to have a few peers uploading to you @ > 5 kB/s than dozens of peers @ < 0.3 kB/s... Then again, if 55 peers works better for you, hey, nobody's stopping you. Use what works for you.
  12. Yeah, that's more like it. The first test was probably just a fluke. Enjoy µTorrent.
  13. It's known that ZoneAlarm can block legitimate packets from getting through, which means things have to be re-sent over and over again. That's the only thing I could think of.
  14. It could have been a bit faster (like around 200 kB/s), but I don't know if you had anything running in the background that could slow it down. The OOo torrent usually maxes out most connections. In either case it's certainly not a bad speed...
  15. 1c3d0g

    uTorrent, ToR, Privoxy

    It's not recommended, since Tor doesn't have the bandwidth to handle stuff like BitTorrent traffic, not to mention you could screw up everything for everyone if the onions go down. Don't be a jerk and ruin things for people. :/
  16. 1c3d0g

    Great programs you use

    Weird. MPlayer plays every file I've thrown at it so far perfectly... :|
  17. I've put away my baseball bat. You can come out now. 1.) Ignore the warning. If you've port forwarded manually, there's no need for UPnP, hence that "error" message. P.S. make sure you've unselected "Enable UPnP port mapping (Windows XP or later only)". 2.) You can safely ignore that warning as well. They've put it in there for people who don't know what they're doing, but since you and I do know what we're doing, that warning does not apply to us.
  18. 1c3d0g

    "Sign Up" for WebUI beta testing

    I think your spamming is reason enough to join...you could do something productive for a change...
  19. aoetwo: sorry for not getting back to you sooner, but I had tons of things to do. Saying that, I'll go straight to the point: 1.) Do you see a green light in your status bar or not? 2.) Have you enabled Protocol Encryption (not Forced) and DHT/PeX?
  20. 1c3d0g

    "Sign Up" for WebUI beta testing

    Directrix: I'm also willing to test the Web GUI extensively. As you know, I'm always idling in the IRC channel and if/when I find a bug with either Firefox, Opera or IE, you'll be the first to know about it.
  21. 1c3d0g

    Great programs you use

    And the codec wars continue... Heh, just wait 'till Firon chimes in...
  22. 1c3d0g

    Great programs you use

    KoolPlaya with your favorite codec pack (CCCP, FFDshow, etc.). I keep them in the odd case that I need to play a weird format file.
  23. 1c3d0g

    Great programs you use

    http://mpui.sourceforge.net/ That's a cool front-end (nice site too, IMHO) for MPlayer. Keep in mind you still need to download the back-end from the MPlayer site. On an unrelated note: I can finally uninstall VLC since Mplayer can also play .BIN files (something no other player has been able to do, including KoolPlaya + codecs).
  24. 1c3d0g

    Logo (56kers beware)

    Yeah CyberChaos, I love your work!